Tuesday, 24 February 2009

Bent Cops

I can honestly say I've never knowingly met a crooked cop. I obviously don't move in those sort of circles, my level of association is where colleagues have been stupid through alcohol. I don't condone drink driving or drunken behaviour, but every officer knows the score and have only themselves to blame if they choose to throw their career away. It does not register with me the level of really serious criminality within our ranks, and I'm talking about the "ten large for the top man" variety. It is however a reality, and the professional standards units appear to be busy and well resourced.

We should all applaud this recent success in Liverpool, where a young officer was engaging in the worst conduct. Ex constable Sayful Islam was lucky to get 18 months in jail. I assume he pleaded guilty only due to overwhelming evidence, and there was even a little play of the race card when he hinted in interview to being fitted up and that they'd been after him for years. This was before he was read the transcript from the bug in his car I suspect.

Everybody else at his station will be shitting themselves that they will be caught on camera sodding around, or gossiping. It must be great fun reviewing the covert product if you work in complaints.

I don't know Islam but I bet he was a cocky brash sort, who took the piss at every opportunity, and was sick alot. Having the gall to phone into work even when on his drugs run is just treating the service and colleagues with contempt. He deserves to be taken down to the car wash in the yard and ....

The only mitigation was of having to pay off his debts. There was a time when police officers had to be solvent financially within reason, otherwise being subject to discipline. Perhaps getting rid of thousands of police flats and section houses is leaving many open to corrupt approaches as debt becomes part of life - or maybe they were never fit to wear the uniform in the first place. I believe the latter.

10 comments:

Dandelion said...

Dearest SoC
It is brilliant to see an actual police officer acknowledging these kinds of issues. For every case where the evidence is overwhelming, there will be many more where evidence is destroyed or otherwise unobtainable. This is why it is so important for the public to see that these types of problems are acknowleged by those behind the uniform, even if there is most of the time, in practice, very little likelihood of redress.

Stressed Out Cop said...

I think the majority of police will acknowledge these issues. There are 100's working towards rooting out the crims amongst us. It is an unfortunate fact. We are objective people and even I am shocked when I hear some of the things that people get upto. Don't forget many will report misconduct from within. We are not perfect and never will be. Don't let the actions of a few spoil the positive contributions of many, which you rarely hear of. Thousands do their best for the silent majority every day - don't need a thank you - just a bit of understanding.

Stressed Out Cop said...

Thanks to anon for the nudge re this story. Best rid of him.

Anonymous said...

You are most welcome, we are best rid of him.

Regards anon.

MarkUK said...

Good on you Stressed for bringing this up. Whilst having such a bad apple amongst the police must be shaming, it's great that he's been busted. All credit for putting it in the spotlight.

I'm concerned that it is alleged that an Essex officer was involved in football violence in Manchester.

IF he is guilty, that would really be extracting the micturation!

TonyF said...

Hi SoC, I feel that you may have nailed it on the head, when you say

"There was a time when police officers had to be solvent financially within reason, otherwise being subject to discipline. Perhaps getting rid of thousands of police flats and section houses is leaving many open to corrupt approaches as debt becomes part of life"

I feel that paying for such things out of the public purse is not only common sense, but should be mandatory. Police Officers should never be put in a position where the temptation of necessity is put in their way. Obviously there will still be the odd weak, or stupid, person who gets caught out, but good leadership would go a long way to obviate such issues.

I suppose suitable punishment should follow too, if falling from grace occurs.

Stressed Out Cop said...

Hi TonyF

I don't really have an answer to solve the serious "criminal" issues, other than reducing debt and therefore temptation.

We are now drug tested - but it's more of a dip sample of people at a station. This results in the sack if positive.

People will always take the piss if they think they can get away with it. I don't see it as a leadership thing - maybe it's a recruitment issue.

pchawkeye said...

After 36 years in the job I have heard the phrase,"Guess who's in the cells",on more than one occasion. Sometimes I'm suprised and sometimes not. What must be remembered is the Force is made up of members of society and as such some have higher moral standards than others I took pride that my morals were always above reproach. I could go on to give examples but lets just say the bent ones covered a wide spectrum of dishonesty. Some never made it past training before being caught others had lots of service and sacrificed their pensions for stupid momentary lapses. I had no sympathy for any of them and saw them as leeches using the cloak of respect and responsibility to hide beneath.
Good ridance to the lot of them.

Anonymous said...

the problem with Police Houses and the like is that they have to be vacated when the officer retires,resigns or moves to another force there is also the divorce/seperation issue. Much the same applies in the Army.Once a soldier leaves after a decent length of service it is tricky and expensive to get on the ladder.Many of the ex soldiers I have worked with overseas are doing so only to earn the money for a house deposit.That said there is no excuse corruption in the police or public service or anywhere else for that matter

Anonymous said...

the problem with Police Houses and the like is that they have to be vacated when the officer retires,resigns or moves to another force there is also the divorce/seperation issue. Much the same applies in the Army.Once a soldier leaves after a decent length of service it is tricky and expensive to get on the ladder.Many of the ex soldiers I have worked with overseas are doing so only to earn the money for a house deposit.That said there is no excuse corruption in the police or public service or anywhere else for that matter